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Illinois child support lawyersChild support is designed to ensure a child’s immediate financial needs are met, such as food and clothing for school. It can also go toward a child’s future, giving a parent the power to start up a college fund for the child. Sadly, statistics indicate that only 44 percent of all custodial parents receive the full amount of support that they are owed. 

One California woman had been just one of many who had not received child support after her divorce. Given custody of their daughter, the woman had been left to raise and financially support the child after her ex-husband skipped town and moved to Canada. From there, the man completely disappeared. Fifty years later, the courts awarded the woman a settlement of $150,000. That amount included the overdue support payments of $35,000, as well as penalty fees and interest for four decades of unpaid support. her experience proves it is never too late to pursue the overdue support you are owed. 

Pursuing Overdue Child Support in Illinois

Parents often feel as though they are alone in their pursuit of overdue child support. However, there are resources and services available to them. One of the most invaluable is the Department of Healthcare and Family Services (DHFS). They have the power and ability to track down a delinquent parent. They can also impose penalties on the parent to encourage payment. Examples may include suspension of the delinquent parent’s driver’s license or professional license, imprisonment, or putting a “freeze” on the delinquent parent’s passport. 

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Illinois child support enforcement lawyersChildren are entitled to emotional and financial support from both parents. When the parents do not live together, financial support typically comes through the payment of child support - but what happens when the paying parent refuses to comply with an order for support? The following information explains how you can enforce delinquent child support payments with the help of a seasoned family law attorney. 

Establishing Proof of Unpaid Support

Before a receiving parent can enforce an order for support, they must first provide proof that the support has gone unpaid. If the payments are made through the Illinois State Disbursement Unit (SDU), the receiving parent can ask the SDU for a record of payments that have been made along with the amount that the paying parent still owes. It is important that receiving parents compare their own records to those of the SDU, however, as they are not always accurate. If payments are made through the circuit clerk’s office, the parent can ask the office for this same information. (Again, it is important to compare records.) Parents who receive payments directly may experience more difficulty in obtaining proof of unpaid payments, as they are the only ones who have a record of the payments made. Thankfully, an attorney can help you with the process. 

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Illinois child support lawyersParents who receive child support often rely on it to ensure their child’s needs are met. What happens, though, if the paying parent falls behind or refuses to make their payments? Besides placing a financial strain on the receiving parent, and potentially the child as well, the paying parent then becomes delinquent on their support. If that support is paid under an existing order with the courts, the receiving parent also has recourse for pursuing their overdue support. Learn more, including when the assistance of an experienced family law attorney may be necessary.

Determining How Much Support is Owed

Before pursuing overdue child support, a receiving parent is encouraged to first determine how much support is owed. If the payments are made through the State Disbursement Unit (SDU), the parent can request payment records directly from SDU. Parents who receive their payments directly through the courts can request such records from the circuit clerk. If payments are made directly to the receiving parent, they must bear the burden of proof in court, meaning they must supply the court with evidence that proves the child support payments were never made.

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Illinois Record Child Support Ruling SettledA child support case where a Cook County judge ruled that a woman was due $2.3 million from her ex-husband and his employer was recently settled out of court with a settlement listed to be $299,000. This case centers around Scott Bos, the father of the children, and his employer at Country Chevrolet where he was a finance manager. Bos was supposed to pay child support to his ex-wife Lisa Watson and Country Chevrolet was supposed to withhold those payments from his paycheck as per a court order that was entered. However, Country Chevrolet refused to withhold the payments from Bos’ checks and argued that he was an independent contractor instead of an employee and therefore they could not withhold the money. The judge disagreed and sided with Watson finding that Country Chevrolet had a duty to withhold the money from Bos’ check.

How Did the Amount Get So High?

It is important to note that the main defendant was Country Chevrolet and they were responsible for the vast majority of the money awarded to Watson. In 2002 Watson and Bos

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Posted on in Child Support

DuPage County family law attorneys, failure to pay child supportAlong with the division of assets and spousal support, if children are involved, a final divorce decree also includes a child custody agreement and an order for child support. The purpose of child support is to protect the best interests of a child and provide support to the parent with primary custody.

However, sometimes a parent will fail to pay their child support obligation, and it can have negative consequences for everyone involved.

Consequences of Failing to Pay Child Support

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