Thumbs Up Thumbs Down
Share Your Experience
X

Wheaton grandparent rights attorneyWhile many families cherish the relationship between grandparents and their grandchildren, there are exceptions. Whether a parent has personal issues with the grandparents or truly has reason to believe that the grandparents are a danger to their children, there are certain conditions in which contact between children and their grandparents may have been terminated. There are also situations in which grandparents may feel that children are better off with them than with the actual parents. However, there are specific necessities laid out by Illinois law that dictate whether grandparents can legally pursue visitation or custody rights.

According to the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, Illinois Chapter, the state of Illinois is very “pro-parent” and “anti-grandparent.” The rules for grandparents seeking visitation rights are fairly strict. The first prerequisite is that the parent or parents’ refusal of grandparent visits must be without good reason.

How to Know if You Have a Case

Aside from showing that parents have unfairly cut off your contact with your grandchildren, your case will need to meet one of the following conditions: 

Continue reading

Wheaton family law attorneysThe divorce process can have a negative impact on all involved parties, but child experts say that it is children who are at the greatest risk for long-term, negative effects. Part of this can be attributed to their lack of control in the situation, but there are other aspects of a divorce that can increase a child’s risk of developing mental, emotional, or behavioral issues during the process. For example, studies suggest children are more likely to suffer from maladjustment if interactions between their parents are contentious or tumultuous during the proceedings. 

What is Childhood Maladjustment? 

Childhood development is a complex process. Its course is determined by both nature and nurture - or what some would call a child’s environment and genetic makeup. Major events that change the dynamics of a family, whether positive or negative, can also have an impact on a child’s development. The birth of a sibling is usually seen as a positive influence, as they must learn to share their time, toys, and attention, which can ultimately make them more compassionate and empathetic people. 

Divorce tends to be seen as a negative influencer. It can leave children feeling at fault for the dissolution of their parent’s marriage. Fighting and tumultuous proceedings can also cause the child to feel as though they have to choose a side in the divorce, which can significantly impact their relationship with both parties - not just the parent that they attempt to snub. Some struggle to adjust when one parent leaves the home. Others may feel as though their entire world has been turned upside down, which may cause them to develop symptoms of depression or anxiety. 

Continue reading

Wheaton alimony lawyersData suggests that more couples are signing prenuptial agreements before getting married, which could be a good thing, as data suggests that couples are less likely to divorce when they have one in place. However, those that have one already may need to review their documents, come 2019. 

How the New Tax Law is Expected to Impact Existing Prenuptial Agreements 

The new tax law, set to go into effect on January 1, 2019, is expected to impact both married and divorcing couples in a significant way. For those going through a divorce, it may affect alimony payments—both in amount and how willing a party is to make them. It is this aspect of the new law that also affects prenuptial agreements. 

For the past 70 years, alimony payments have been tax-deductible for the payor and taxed as income for receivers. The new tax law eliminates this element of divorce law. Sadly, this change is expected to leave less money for the family, as a whole. Without the tax benefit, payers may have less discretionary spending money than their spouses. The courts have to balance this out by reducing the alimony payment amount, so even though the receiving party may not have to report the payments as taxable income, they may ultimately receive less money. Neither party benefits from this, unfortunately, but the change is inevitable. 

Continue reading

DuPage County divorce attorneysDivorce can be a costly endeavor - especially when you are not prepared for the process. Thankfully, it is possible to place yourself ahead of the proceedings. Learn how with the following pre-divorce money management tips, and discover how our seasoned Wheaton divorce lawyers can help you with the process, long before you ever even file. 

1. Track Income, Assets, and Expenses

Before filing for divorce, it is crucial that you have a clear understanding of your financial situation. All debts, income, real estate, retirement accounts, pension plans, and other assets (i.e. jewelry, collections, etc.) that were acquired during the marriage should be considered. Once you have all the information you need, such as account statements and appraisals, make copies and store them in a safe place where your spouse cannot find them, such as in a safety deposit box or at a relative’s house. Also, be sure to regularly update documentation on any assets that may fluctuate in value, such as your bank account or retirement account. 

2. Check and Monitor Your Credit

Spouses who suspect a divorce may be on the horizon can become retaliatory, sometimes in the worst way possible. They may attempt to take out credit in your name, or they may run up your credit card bills. Avoid such issues by monitoring your credit before and after you file. Remove your spouse as an authorized user on any personal accounts, freeze or dissolve joint accounts (only do the latter under the guidance of your attorney), and report any suspicious activity. 

Continue reading

Wheaton divorce attorneysWhile many marriages end amicably, there are some that end with bitter words and violence. In an alarming number of these cases, the abuse dates back to before the marriage's dissolution. Thankfully, victims of abuse can find at least some solace in the law; they are afforded many protections in the workplace, and they have the right to seek an order of protection to keep their abuser at bay. However, if there are children involved, their divorce case usually becomes far more complicated. 

Understanding How Illinois Views Parental Rights

Parental rights are not intended for the parent; the courts afford them to parents to protect a child’s right to receive financial and emotional support from both of its biological parents. Because of this, victims of abuse may need to face some scary possibilities during their divorce: 

  • Abusers may still be permitted access to the children. If the courts determine that the children have not been abused and are not at risk for abuse, they may be permitted both parenting time and a share of the allocation of parental responsibilities; 
  • Situations involving questionable or confirmed abuse can still allow for visitation, even if only under supervision; and
  • If child abuse or neglect significantly pre-dates the divorce, you can be implied in the case. The law uses this penalty to protect children from long-term abuse and to deter people from falsely reporting cases of long-term abuse. Unfortunately, it can negatively affect true victims who have struggled to safely leave the relationship. As such, any cases of long-term abuse should be handled carefully, and only with the skilled assistance of a divorce attorney. 

Child Endangerment Charges in an Illinois Divorce Case

The divorce process can become highly complex if child endangerment charges are brought against you or your spouse during the divorce process. You or your spouse may be questioned or interviewed by the police and Child Protective Services. The courts may also assign a Guardian Ad Litem to your child’s case. Your children may even be placed in protective custody and sent to live with a family member or in a foster home. Regardless of whether you are the accused or the victim, ensure you embark on such divorces with great care. 

Continue reading
Abraham Lincoln A lawyer’s time and advice are his stock and trade. -Abraham Lincoln
Davi Law Group, LLC handles family law, estate planning and real estate matters for clients in Chicago and throughout the western suburbs including DuPage County, Will County, Kane County, Kendall County and Cook County and the cities of Aurora, Bloomingdale, Bolingbrook, Carol Stream, Darien, Downers Grove, Elmhurst, Geneva, Glen Ellyn, Hinsdale, Joliet, Kendall County, Lisle, Lombard, Naperville, Oak Park, Oak Brook, Oswego, Park Ridge, Roselle, St. Charles, Villa Park, Warrenville, Wheaton, Winfield, Woodridge and Yorkville, Illinois.
Warrenville Office
Address28371 Davis Parkway, Suite 103, Warrenville, IL 60555
Phone(630) 657-5052
Fax(888) 350-9195
Wheaton Office
Address1776 S. Naperville Road, Building A, Suite 105, Wheaton, IL 60189
Phone630-580-6373
Fax(888) 350-9195
Chicago Office
Address321 N. Clark Street, Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60654
Phone(312) 985-5676
Fax(888) 350-9195
Joliet Office
Address58 N. Chicago Street, Suite 102,
Joliet, IL 60432
Phone(815) 582-4901
Fax(888) 350-9195
Contact us